Why the strength of your cell signal will affect the types of Facebook ads you receive

Facebook to target your cell phone signal

Gigaom

Auto-play video ads can be annoying, but what’s more maddening is when the ad doesn’t even load properly. On mobile devices, that’s often because you’ve got a weak cellular connection, which is why [company]Facebook[/company] is starting to allow advertisers to target ads based on the strength of someone’s cell phone signal, according to a new article in Advertising Age.

The program will give advertisers a new tool to help target and run video ads, which are among Facebook’s most expensive ad products and have been an area of focus of the company in the past year. They’re also data-hungry, so someone on a 3G connection might see stuttering or laggy video. He or she will move on, and that becomes a wasted impression.

So Facebook’s new targeting option will give advertisers the option to, say, serve a text-based ad to someone in a remote area with weak reception while also displaying a…

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The Worst Neurobollocks Infographics on the Web

NeuroBollocks

Regardless what you think of infographics (and personally, I think they’re largely a pustulent, suppurating boil on the bloated arse of the internet) there are some good, useful ones out there. However, these are vastly outweighed by the thousands of utterly ghastly, misleading, poorly-referenced and pointless ones.

Because I’ve been on holiday for the last week, my levels of rage and misanthropy have dropped somewhat from their usual DEFCON-1-global-thermonuclear-war-the-only-winning-move-is-not-to-play levels, so I thought trying to find the absolute worst neuroscience-related infographics on the web might be a good way to top the vital bile reserves back up again. And oh boy, was I right. There are some doozies.

First up is this purple and blue monstrosity titled ’15 things you didn’t know about the brain.’ Here we learn (amongst other howlers) that the capacity of the brain is 4 terabytes, men process information on the left side while women use…

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Famous Artworks that Inspired 15 Films

Flavorwire

There is a fascinating interplay between the visual cultures of film and art. Directors have frequently used imagery from painting and other art forms to shape the look and meaning of their works. Earlier this week, website Philebrity appealed to our inner art history nerd and reminded us of a strong visual influence behind Terrence Malick’s 1978 film Days of Heaven. We feature the movie’s art-world doppelgänger after the jump, along with other artworks that informed frames and entire visual themes in different movies.

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The Facebook Experiment: The “Why” Questions

Paul Bernal's Blog

Facebook question markA great deal has been written about the Facebook experiment – what did they actually do, how did they do it, what was the effect, was it ethical, was it legal, will it be challenged and so forth – but I think we need to step back a little and ask two further questions. Why did they do the experiment, and why did they publish it in this ‘academic’ form.

What Facebook tell us about their motivations for the experiment should be taken with a distinct pinch of salt: we need to look further. What Facebook does, it generally does for one simple reason: to benefit Facebook’s bottom line. They do things to build their business, and to make more money. That may involve getting more subscribers, or making those subscribers stay online for longer, or, most crucially and most directly, by getting more money from its advertisers. Subscribers are…

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Susan Hashtag and Other Punny Illustrations of Cultural Icons

Flavorwire

Catherine Pearson’s Vaguely Important People series offers irreverent twists on subjects most would consider very important: from W.B. Yeats to Susan Sontag, Pearson tweaks art museum and college bookshelf staples into playful, pun-laden illustrations. Considering Sontag’s views on photography, we don’t imagine she’d be too happy with her portrait as a selfie-taking hashtag addict, but along with “DJ W.B. Beatz” and “Jane Birkinstock,” she’s certainly in good company. All of Pearson’s prints are available for purchase here; click through for a look at a sampling of her VIPs.

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Databending: Applying Audio Effects to Image Files

Question Something

A semi-complete documentation of Audacity Effects on image files.

This can also be found on Tumblr, if you prefer.

When pursuing the wonderful practice of databending I think that experimentation is all important. Discovering new ways to do things is a key element to the entire experience. But I also know that without tutorials from Antonio Roberts (HelloCatFood) and Stallio (AnimalsWithinAnimals) I wouldn’t have taken the steps to really engage in the subject. They acted as a gateway for me to try new things and experiment with other ideas.

If you’ve never encountered it before, I highly recommend checking out Antonio Roberts’ tutorial on databending with Audacity, which can be found here.

If you’ve never heard of Audacity, then here is the website. It’s a free audio editing program with tools to cut and paste sound and to add effects, but it can also be so…

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Exploring the New Yorker’s Archives

Chapman/Chapman

The New Yorker‘s archives are open to all for the next couple months. After that, the metered paywall goes up. So for those of you who haven’t subscribed, here are a few recommended gems:

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Snapshots of Alaska in Black and White

Planet Bell

Denali National Park in the summer is full of vibrant color. This is a surprise to a lot of people who think of Alaska as a winter wasteland where snow lasts 11 months a year and the sun never rises (Trust me, those people exist). But we do get about four months each year of green trees, colorful wildflowers, brilliant fall colors and if we are lucky, some rich blue skies.

As a result, I don’t usually think in terms of black and white when photographing the Great Land. This gallery below however, is an eclectic mix of photos I’ve taken this summer. From the Alaska Railroad to rainbows to fireweed buds, this gallery provides a little glimpse of Alaska in grayscale.

Click on any photo to open up a slideshow view and if you leave a comment you will be entered into a drawing to win 1…

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